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Location: Interviewee’s home
Interviewer: Holly Parsons
Videographer: Sean Kelly

00.03 – Rhiannon: So for me Teddy was an emotional resource rather than a toy. I don’t think I did much with him but I vaguely remember including him in tea parties, and that sort of thing. But I used to spend a lot of time talking to him. I do remember that.

Rhiannon: I think children of the 1950s it’s not so bad now, but I think my parents anyway were quite uncomfortable with distress, so I used to tell him when I was fed up or sad. It’s, he’s got a lot of my secrets this teddy.

0.44 – Rhiannon: I’ve got a bit of a gruesome memory of him. Which is really hilarious in, in retrospect. When I was about 5 I had an older cousin who’s 6 years older than me. He was 11. And he came to my house with his parents one day and he decided that he didn’t like Teddy and he was going to punish him. And I do wonder whether it was round the time of some executions or something gruesome was going on in society and he hang him from the kitchen washing line. My mum had a inter washing line and he said I’m going to hang him. And I’ve talked to him about, he’s 72 now I think and I’ve talked to him about it we’ve laughed about it since. That’s quite gruesome really. But obviously it didn’t work. Teddy obviously survived and was thus pardoned.

1.30 – Rhiannon: I remember my brother having Meccano and playing with it together yeah, because I was a bit of a tomboy so I quite liked the boy stuff, I didn’t like the car stuff very much, but I quite like, I do remember putting Meccano together. And him getting frustrated with me because I couldn’t quite do it correctly. Train sets and stuff like that.

Rhiannon: I think it was mostly because we were quite small when we had that. I suspect that my brother made things that looked like lorries and cars. But I can remember things that looked like bridges and you know engineering stuff, because you got the suggestions with the Meccano of what to make so probably that sort of thing. But I’m quite old now I don’t remember the detail of it at all really.

Holly: Was it important to you?

2.19 – Rhiannon: Yeah I think it was because it wasn’t a girl’s toy and I think even prior to Germaine Greer you know I think that was probably quite unusual that I was interested in playing with the boys’ toys. But I don’t I haven’t spoken to any contemporaries about it. I think it was part of the whole tomboy thing.

2.39 – Rhiannon: I also have another doll memory, when I was about 5 my mother asked a relative to dress a dolls pram because we had prams then, and people used to put frilly stuff on them and make little pillows, you know, like you would for an adult pram, so I had a little miniature pram. And my aunty I think it was my mother’s great aunt actually did this, and my parents lived in quite a small flat so they needed to hide it for a few days running up to Christmas. And they hid it down the side of my mother’s bed and I ran in to the bedroom because I was bored and I ran in to the kitchen where my mother was having tea with the great aunt and I said “Mummy I’ve just seen this amazing dolls pram” I probably didn’t say amazing but you know this gorgeous dolls pram thing and my aunty, quick as a flash to cover herself said, “that’s not for you, it’s for another little girl”. Demolishing, so not only have I got an executed teddy, I’ve got a dolls pram that I’m not going to have, but of course I did get it in the end, but I remember feeling really awful. Hm

RECORDING ENDS – 3.50

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Location: Interviewee’s home
Interviewer: Holly Parsons
Videographer: Sean Kelly

00.04 – Holly: Hi Rhiannon.

Rhiannon: Hi.

Holly: Today we are going to be interviewing you about toys, bears and construction toys. So before we start where were you born and when?

Rhiannon: I was born in Lewisham in 1950.

Holly: And where did you spend your childhood?

Rhiannon: Mostly in South London, and I left home when I was 19 but I stayed in south London, then I moved to Surrey and then I moved to Brighton.

Holly: Excellent, so did you have a teddy bear?

0.30 – Rhiannon: I did have a teddy bear, here he is.

Holly: So what was your teddy bears name? Can you tell me about him?

Rhiannon: Teddy, I wasn’t very creative when I was little but I am better now.

Holly: So what is Teddy made of? How old is he?

0.47 – Rhiannon: Right well teddy was brought by my mother’s twin brother in Israel, where he was working after the war, about two years before I was born because my mother had fertility problems so, this, I was a very planned baby. And er after I was born Teddy appeared. So he is an Israeli teddy. Interesting. I am not sure what the fabric is but he is definitely full of sawdust. He lost his eyes a long time ago. He had the teddy button orange and black eyes I think. But I just can’t bring myself to get rid of him.

Holly: I can understand that, so you came by him though your uncle.

Rhiannon: Yes

01.34 – Holly: Ok. Do you remember playing with it? What sort of games did you play?

Rhiannon: Definitely, I don’t really remember playing games. I was quite a serious little girl. But I remember him being quite comforting and talking to him, and that lasted until I got a dog, because I can remember talking to the dog if I got upset. So for me Teddy was an emotional resource rather than a toy. I don’t think I did much with him but I vaguely remember including him in tea parties, and that sort of thing. But I used to spend a lot of time talking to him. I do remember that.

2.15 – Holly: How did you feel about him?

Rhiannon: Well I think children of the 1950s it’s not so bad now, but I think my parents anyway were quite uncomfortable with distress, so I used to tell him when I was fed up or sad. It’s, he’s got a lot of my secrets this teddy.

Holly: It’s a good job he’s not telling I suppose.

Rhiannon: I don’t think that’s going to happen.

Holly: What are your best memories of Teddy?

2.49 – Rhiannon: I’ve got a bit of a gruesome memory of him. Which is really hilarious in, in retrospect. When I was about 5 I had an older cousin who’s 6 years older than me. He was 11. And he came to my house with his parents one day and he decided that he didn’t like Teddy and he was going to punish him. And I do wonder whether it was round the time of some executions or something gruesome was going on in society and he hang him from the kitchen washing line. My mum had a inter washing line and he said I’m going to hang him. And I’ve talked to him about, he’s 72 now I think and I’ve talked to him about it we’ve laughed about it since. That’s quite gruesome really. But obviously it didn’t work. Teddy obviously survived and was thus pardoned. So that’s a bit . . .

Holly: I think teddies are a bit immune to executions.

Rhiannon: Yes. I think boys are a bit gruesome aren’t they?

Holly: So your cousin remembers the actual event that’s quite interesting that you both remember it.

Rhiannon: Yes, yeah

Holly: So we’ll move on from Teddy for the moment. Do you remember playing with dolls?

3.57 – Rhiannon: I can only remember one doll and I remember her hair and you know when you see people that have had plugs put in, that’s what her hair looked like, that’s what I remember about her. But the doll that I remember, the dollies that I remember. You used to be able to get a magazine with a cut-out cardboard cut-out doll. And you used to cut out every week you’d get or every month you’d get new umm clothes for them. They had little tabs on them, so I do remember playing with that quite a lot. But an actual 3d doll I can only remember having the one.

Holly: So the one doll you do remember do you remember what she was made out of or what her name was?

Rhiannon: Yeah she definitely some sort of nasty plastic but soft. I think that had just come in. I remember she had a little bottle so you could feed her like a baby. And that, that when you think about it that was quite advanced for the 1950s, they must have just come in at the time I don’t remember what she was called though, Dolly probably.

Holly: Do you remember how you came to own it?

Rhiannon: I guess I probably got it for a birthday or Christmas present.

Holly: How did you play with it? What sort of games did you play?

Rhiannon: I used to dress her and undress her. And one of my grandmas was a dress maker and used to make some clothes for her. She lived in Scotland, my father is Scottish and she used to come and stay with us for about three months every couple of years. And my mother had a sewing machine and I’d come home from school and she would have made me a dress and she would sometimes make a little dress for dolly, that happened a couple of times.

Holly: How did you feel about dolly?

Rhiannon: I don’t think I had any strong feeling about dolly really; she was an object just to play with. I liked the whole dressing up thing.

Holly: Do you remember how important it was or she was?

Rhiannon: Well the fact that she is so strongly in my memory, I guess means I must have spent a lot of time with her, I think my mother used to buy clothes and I used to have a miniature version of her clothes I remember that, so maybe that was what I was doing with dolly you know being just little girls copy mummy don’t they so.

Holly: Do you still have the doll?

Rhiannon: No I don’t

Holly: what was your best memories of her?

Rhiannon: I don’t know just some diversion really because I was a bit of a bookish kid to be honest. As soon as I could read I had my face in a book. So I didn’t have masses of toys and my mum and dad didn’t have any money really, so you know, we didn’t umm I didn’t have masses of toys like now I go in to my grandsons rooms and it’s like woo. And my children as well had loads of things. But I can remember having maybe four or five things which is, you know.

Holly: So we will stay with dolls for a minute did you play with or have any action figures?

6.50 – Rhiannon: No I think I was a bit young for that. I don’t think my brother did either. I think he just had Dinky cars; he’s got a garage now so that was pressing. But no he just used to dismantle everything ad I remember him having a lot of dinky cars and stuff that I was not very interested in. but I didn’t have any, I don’t think Sindy and Barbie had happened when I was a child, I’m not sure, you’ll know, you’re the historian.

7.18 – Holly: So we will move on from dolls to construction toys. Do you remember having dolls or construction toys?

Rhiannon: I remember my brother having Meccano and playing with it together yeah, because I was a bit of a tomboy so I quite liked the boy stuff, I didn’t like the car stuff very much, but I quite like, I do remember putting Meccano together. And him getting frustrated with me because I couldn’t quite do it correctly. Train sets and stuff like that.

Holly: So do you remember about the Meccano? Was it metal stuff or what colour was it?

Rhiannon: I really loved it actually, thinking about it. I really loved that whole thing of creating something, putting something together, building something. It was quite interesting really on reflection, but we didn’t have Lego or Duplo. No I don’t know when that was launched but I think I was a bit young for that as well. So it really was a case of, Meccano is awesome isn’t it, it’s just so kind of hands on, I mean Lego you just stick them together. Yeah

Holly: Do you remember what you used to make from the Meccano?

Rhiannon: I think it was mostly because we were quite small when we had that. I suspect that my brother made things that looked like lorries and cars. But I can remember things that looked like bridges and you know engineering stuff, because you got the suggestions with the Meccano of what to make so probably that sort of thing. But I’m quite old now I don’t remember the detail of it at all really.

Holly: So how did you play with it or what sort of games did you play?

Rhiannon: Well we used to put it together and pull it apart and then there would be bits found under the sofa years later, you know.

Holly: Was it important to you?

Rhiannon: Yeah I think it was because it wasn’t a girls toy and I think even prior to Germaine Greer you know I think that was probably quite unusual that I was interested in playing with the boys toys. But I don’t I haven’t spoken to any contemporaries about it. I think it was part of the whole tomboy thing.

Holly: Yeah

Rhiannon: I still like getting in there with the guys as well, you know I’m still a bit like that.

Holly: Do you still have any Meccano?

Rhiannon: No

Holly: And what’s your best memories of Meccano?

Rhiannon: Just the fascination of seeing something taking shape and I quite like the technical thing of putting it together and putting the little connecting bolts in and stuff like that, they overlapped didn’t they and had lots of holes in them yeah

9.46 – Holly: So did you have, ever have, ever want a teddy bear, doll or construction toy that you never got?

Rhiannon: Not those three but I can remember clearly wanting a little cooker that I saw in Selfridges in Lewisham and asking my mother for Christmas, and it was absolutely beautiful it even had little crystal things in it, that would glow so it looked like the cooker was on and the knobs moved and you could take the stuff in it, it was a really good miniaturised cooker, but my uncle brought me a cooker for Christmas and it was a nasty plastic moulded thing that you could, nothing worked on it and I remember being really devastated.

10.24 – Rhiannon: I also have another doll memory, when I was about 5 my mother asked a relative to dress a dolls pram because we had prams then, and people used to put frilly stuff on them and make little pillows, you know, like you would for an adult pram, so I had a little miniature pram. And my aunty I think it was my mother’s great aunt actually did this, and my parents lived in quite a small flat so they needed to hide it for a few days running up to Christmas. And they hid it down the side of my mother’s bed and I ran in to the bedroom because I was bored and I ran in to the kitchen where my mother was having tea with the great aunt and I said “Mummy I’ve just seen this amazing dolls pram” I probably didn’t say amazing but you know this gorgeous dolls pram thing and my aunty, quick as a flash to cover herself said, “that’s not for you, it’s for another little girl”. Demolishing, so not only have I got an executed teddy, I’ve got a dolls pram that I’m not going to have, but of course I did get it in the end, but I remember feeling really awful. Hm [laughs]

Holly: Are there any other memories of your toys that you would like to share?

11.42 – Rhiannon: I remember the little dolls pram and the little cooker, and the dollies with the tabs on, I loved those, I loved dressing those up. Marbles, my brother and I used to play marbles a lot; he’s four years younger than me. Umm I didn’t have an enormous amount of toys and I think really once I got to five, I started to play the violin and I was a bit of a prodigy so I spent a lot of time playing the violin and reading so I don’t think toys figured very much in the rest of my childhood.

[pneumatic drill sound from here until end of the interview]

Holly: I didn’t ask you earlier about the paper dolls. How did you used to play with them?

Rhiannon: Oh I used to really look forward to cutting out the new dresses, and or the skirts and tops, I think they even had little shoes made out of paper, remembering vaguely, for some reason I can’t tell you why, but I just loved that, it’s really weird but I just loved it.

Holly: Was that the same as your plastic doll that you liked dressing them up or did you play with them around that.

Rhiannon: No, no we just, I think we just all, we liked the whole process of cutting out the new, I think it was the novelty and the change. You know so many toys nowadays only do one thing don’t they? That’s it, there you know. But it was like looking forward to going to the newsagents every now and then a getting a new set of these. Do you know what I’m talking about these tab top things?

Holly: Yeah

Rhiannon: Yeah, I, don’t, I don’t think they do them now, I don’t know.

Holly: I walked past a shop this afternoon and I saw them.

Rhiannon: And they are still doing them, that’s brilliant.

Holly: Yeah Dave’s comics, they do books of them that you can cut out.

Rhiannon: I can’t tell you why I loved that so much, I never turned out to be a fashion designer or anything like that, I’m sure people did. I think it was just the thing of creating something and doing something. And I was quite a creative child and I had a bit of garden, my mum had a garden and she gave me a bit of it, about a square metre and I grew little plants in it and I used to collect little trinkets and little figures and putting them in the garden, I haven’t got any gnomes now, it’s not my thing. But I remember doing, I remember spending a lot of time on that and I wasn’t allowed to have a bicycle because I lived on the south circular and my parents were frightened that I would cycle out in to the road.

Holly: I think all parents are worried about that. Alright that’s the end of my questions, thank you for participating.

Rhiannon: You’re welcome.

INTERVIEW ENDS – 14.10

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7th October 2014
Location: Interviewee’s home
Interviewer: Holly Parsons
Videographer: Sean Kelly

Holly: Hi Rhiannon.

Rhiannon: Hi.

Holly: Today we are going to be interviewing you about bears, dolls and construction toys. So before we start where were you born and when?

Rhiannon: I was born in Lewisham in 1950.

Holly: And where did you spend your childhood?

Rhiannon: Mostly in South London, and I left home when I was 19 but i stayed in south London, then I moved to Surrey and then I moved to Brighton.

Holly: Excellent, so did you have a teddy bear?

Rhiannon: I did have a teddy bear, here he is.

Holly: So what was your teddy bears name? Can you tell me about him?

Rhiannon: Teddy, I wasn’t very creative when I was little but I am better now.

Holly: So what is Teddy made of? How old is he?

0:44 – Rhiannon: Right well teddy was brought by my mother’s twin brother in Israel, where he was working after the war, about two years before I was born because my mother had fertility problems so, this, I was a very planned baby. And er after I was born Teddy appeared. So he is an Israeli teddy. Interesting. I am not sure what the fabric is but he is definitely full of sawdust. He lost his eyes a long time ago. He had the teddy button orange and black eyes I think. But I just can’t bring myself to get rid of him.

Holly: I can understand that, so you came by him though your uncle.

Rhiannon: Yes

01.31 – Holly: Ok. Do you remember playing with it? What sort of games did you play?

Rhiannon: Definitely, I don’t really remember playing games. I was quite a serious little girl. But I remember him being quite comforting and talking to him, and that lasted until I got a dog, because I can remember talking to the dog if I got upset. So for me Teddy was an emotional resource rather than a toy. I don’t think I did much with him but I vaguely remember including him in tea parties, and that sort of thing. But I used to spend a lot of time talking to him. I do remember that.

2:08 – Holly: How did you feel about him?

Rhiannon: Well I think children of the 1950s it’s not so bad now, but I think my parents anyway were quite uncomfortable with distress, so I used to tell him when I was upset or sad. It’s, he’s got a lot of my secrets this teddy.

Holly: It’s good job he’s not telling I suppose. Rhiannon: I don’t think that’s going to happen. Holly: What are your best memories of Teddy?

2:50 – Rhiannon: I’ve got a bit of a gruesome memory of him. Which is really hilarious in, in retrospect. When I was about 5 I had an older cousin who’s 6 years older than me. He was 11. And he came to my house with his parents one day and he decided that he didn’t like Teddy and he was going to punish him. And I do wonder whether it was round the time of some executions or something gruesome was going on in society and he hang him from the kitchen washing line. My mum had a inter washing line and he said I’m going to hang him. And I’ve talked to him about, he’s 72 now I think and I’ve talked to him about it we’ve laughed about it since. That’s quite gruesome really. But obviously it didn’t work. Teddy obviously survived and was thus pardoned. So that’s a bit . . .

Holly: I think teddies are a bit immune to executions.

Rhiannon: Yes. I think boys are a bit gruesome aren’t they?

Holly: So your cousin remembers the actual event that’s quite interesting that you both remember it.

Rhiannon: Yes, yeah

Holly: So we’ll move on from Teddy for the moment. Do you remember playing with dolls?

3:50 – Rhiannon: I can only remember one doll and I remember her hair and you know when you see people that have had plugs put in, that’s what her hair looked like, that’s what I remember about her. But the doll that I remember, the dollies that I remember. You used to be able to get a magazine with a cut-out cardboard cut-out doll. And you used to cut out every week you’d get or every month you’d get new umm clothes for them. They had little tabs on them, so I do remember playing with that quite a lot. But an actual 3d doll I can only remember having the one.

Holly: So the one doll you do remember do you remember what she was made out of or what her name was?

Rhiannon: Yeah she definitely some sort of nasty plastic but soft. I think that had just come in. I remember she had a little bottle so you could feed her like a baby. And that, that when you think about it that was quite advanced for the 1950s, they must have just come in at the time I don’t remember what she was called though, Dolly probably.

Holly: Do you remember how you came to own it?

Rhiannon: I guess I probably got it for a birthday or Christmas present.

Holly: How did you play with it? What sort of games did you play?

Rhiannon: I used to dress her and undress her. And one of my grandmas was a dress maker and used to make some clothes for her. She lived in Scotland, my father is Scottish and she used to come and stay with us for about three months every couple of years. And my mother had a sewing machine and I’d come home from school and she would have made me a dress and she would sometimes make a little dress for dolly, that happened a couple of times.

Holly: How did you feel about dolly?

Rhiannon: I don’t think I had any strong feeling about dolly really; she was an object just to play with. I liked the whole dressing up thing.

Holly: Do you remember how important it was or she was?

Rhiannon: Well the fact that she is so strongly in my memory, I guess means I must have spent a lot of time with her, I think my mother used to buy clothes and I used to have a miniature version of her clothes I remember that, so maybe that was what I was doing with dolly you know being just little girls copy mummy don’t they so.

Holly: Do you still have the doll?

Rhiannon: No I don’t

Holly: what was your best memories of her?

Rhiannon: I don’t know just some diversion really because I was a bit of a bookish kid to be honest. As soon as I could read I had my face in a book. So I didn’t have masses of toys and my mum and dad didn’t have any money really, so you know, we didn’t umm I didn’t have masses of toys like now I go in to my grandsons rooms and it’s like woo. And my children as well had loads of things. But I can remember having maybe four or five things which is, you know.

Holly: So we will stay with dolls for a minute did you play with or have any action figures?

Rhiannon: No I think I was a bit young for that. I don’t think my brother did either. I think he just had Dinky cars; he’s got a garage now so that was pressing. But no he just used to dismantle everything ad I remember him having a lot of dinky cars and stuff that I was not very interested in. but I didn’t have any, I don’t think Sindy and Barbie had happened when I was a child, I’m not sure, you’ll know, you’re the historian.

07:10 – Holly: So we will move on from dolls to construction toys. Do you remember having dolls or construction toys?

Rhiannon: I remember my brother having Meccano and playing with it together yeah, because I was a bit of a tomboy so I quite liked the boy stuff, I didn’t like the car stuff very much, but I quite like, I do remember putting Meccano together. And him getting frustrated with me because I couldn’t quite do it correctly. Train sets and stuff like that.

Holly: So do you remember about the Meccano? Was it metal stuff or what colour was it

Rhiannon: I really loved it actually, thinking about it. I really loved that whole thing of creating something, putting something together, building something. It was quite interesting really on reflection, but we didn’t have Lego or Duplo. No I don’t know when that was launched but I think I was a bit young for that as well. So it really was a case of, Meccano is awesome isn’t it, it’s just so kind of hands on, I mean Lego you just stick them together. Yeah

Holly: Do you remember what you used to make from the Meccano?

Rhiannon: I think it was mostly because we were quite small when we had that. I suspect that my brother made things that looked like lorries and cars. But I can remember things that looked like bridges and you know engineering stuff, because you got the suggestions with the Meccano of what to make so probably that sort of thing. But I’m quite old now I don’t remember the detail of it at all really.

Holly: So how did you play with it or what sort of games did you play?

Rhiannon: Well we used to put it together and pull it apart and then there would be bits found under the sofa years later, you know.

Holly: Was it important to you?

Rhiannon: Yeah I think it was because it wasn’t a girls toy and I think even prior to Germaine Greer you know I think that was probably quite unusual that I was interested in playing with the boys toys. But I don’t I haven’t spoken to any contemporaries about it. I think it was part of the whole tomboy thing.

Holly: Yeah

Rhiannon: I still like getting in there with the guys as well, you know I’m still a bit like that.

Holly: Do you still have any Meccano?

Rhiannon: No

Holly: And what’s your best memories of Meccano?

Rhiannon: Just the fascination of seeing something taking shape and I quite like the technical thing of putting it together and putting the little connecting bolts in and stuff like that, they overlapped didn’t they and had lots of holes in them yeah

Holly: so did you have, ever have, ever want a teddy bear, doll or construction toy that you never got?

Rhiannon: Not those three but I can remember clearly wanting a little cooker that I saw in Selfridges in Lewisham and asking my mother for Christmas, and it was absolutely beautiful it even had little crystal things in it, that would glow so it looked like the cooker was on and the knobs moved and you could take the stuff in it, it was a really good miniaturised cooker, but my uncle brought me a cooker for Christmas and it was a nasty plastic moulded thing that you could, nothing worked on it and I remember being really devastated.

10:19 – Rhiannon: I also have another doll memory, when I was about 5 my mother asked a relative to dress a dolls pram because we had prams then, and people used to put frilly stuff on them and make little pillows, you know, like you would for an adult pram, so I had a little miniature pram. And my aunty I think it was my mother’s great aunt actually did this, and my parents lived in quite a small flat so they needed to hide it for a few days running up to Christmas. And they hid it down the side of my mother’s bed and I ran in to the bedroom because I was bored and I ran in to the kitchen where my mother was having tea with the great aunt and I said “Mummy I’ve just seen this amazing dolls pram” I probably didn’t say amazing but you know this gorgeous dolls pram thing and my aunty, quick as a flash to cover herself said, “that’s not for you, it’s for another little girl”. Demolishing, so not only have I got an executed teddy, I’ve got a dolls pram that I’m not going to have, but of course I did get it in the end, but I remember feeling really awful.

Holly: Are there any other memories of your toys that you would like to share? Hm [laughs]

Rhiannon: I remember the little dolls pram and the little cooker, and the dollies with the tabs on, I loved those, I loved dressing those up. Marbles, my brother and I used to play marbles a lot; he’s four years younger than me. Umm I didn’t have an enormous amount of toys and I think really once I got to five, I started to play the violin and I was a bit of a prodigy so I spent a lot of time playing the violin and reading so I don’t think toys figured very much in the rest of my childhood.

[pneumatic drill sound from here until end of the interview]

Holly: I didn’t ask you earlier about the paper dolls. How did you used to play with them?

Rhiannon: Oh I used to really look forward to cutting out the new dresses, and or the skirts and tops, I think they even had little shoes made out of paper, remembering vaguely, for some reason I can’t tell you why, but I just loved that, it’s really weird but I just loved it.

Holly: Was that the same as your plastic doll that you liked dressing them up or did you play with them around that.

Rhiannon: No, no we just, I think we just all, we liked the whole process of cutting out the new, I think it was the novelty and the change. You know so many toys nowadays only do one thing don’t they? That’s it, there you know. But it was like looking forward to going to the newsagents every now and then a getting a new set of these. Do you know what I’m talking about these tab top things?

Holly: Yeah

Rhiannon: Yeah, I, don’t, I don’t think they do them now, I don’t know.

Holly: I walked past a shop this afternoon and I saw them.

Rhiannon: And they are still doing them, that’s brilliant.

Holly: Yeah Dave’s comics, they do books of them that you can cut out.

Rhiannon: I can’t tell you why I loved that so much, I never turned out to be a fashion designer or anything like that, I’m sure people did. I think it was just the thing of creating something and doing something. And I was quite a creative child and I had a bit of garden, my mum had a garden and she gave me a bit of it, about a square metre and I grew little plants in it and I used to collect little trinkets and little figures and putting them in the garden, I haven’t got any gnomes now, it’s not my thing. But I remember doing, I remember spending a lot of time on that and I wasn’t allowed to have a bicycle because I lived on the south circular and my parents were frightened that I would cycle out in to the road.

Holly: I think all parents are worried about that. Alright that’s the end of my questions, thank you for participating.

Rhiannon: You’re welcome.

INTERVIEW ENDS – 14.08

Rhiannon

Rhiannon was born in Lewisham in 1950. In the short version (3m 50s) of her interview she discusses her teddy bear, Meccano and her dolls pram. In the full version (14m 10s) she also discusses her dolls, especially cut out paper dolls, and the cooker that she wanted but didn’t get.