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3rd September 2014
Location: Brighton Toy and Model Museum
Interviewer – Emily Hill
Videographer – Sam Humphreys

Matt: Yeah, well I have loved Thomas the Tank Engine since as long as I can remember, so I think that’s what got me into trains, and I’ve still got the very first Hornby train ever built. It’s a bright red tank engine, it still works, with these bright blue, yellow and red coaches and trucks. And I was hooked ever since. I’ve still got my model railway, I’m still adding to it. Yeah, I had some of the Hornby Thomas Trains and some of that as well. I’ve sold that all now, but, yeah, hours of fun with trains.

Emily: What kind of age did you begin to play with trains?

Matt: Um, gosh I’ve been playing with trains since as long as I can remember. I must have been one, if not less than one when I got my first train.

Emily: So it’s almost a life..

Matt: A lifelong thing.

Emily: Did you construct these train sets on your own or?

Matt: Yeah, my dad built most of them, uh, when I was little he used to help. As I grew up I started adding houses and such. But, yeah my dad did a lot of the technical stuff. I just played with it.

Emily: And they are electric?

Matt: Yeah. They’re electric, he used to wire them up.

Emily: Did you play with your brother, with the train sets?

Matt: My brother was never really into trains. It was more my thing. He was more of a.. he preferred his lego and such but yeah, trains were my thing.

Emily: What are your best memories of..?

Matt: I think just, the first house I grew up in. where we had our train set in the attic. So just going up there with Dad. Playing with trains for hours.

Emily: And there was a collection that you added to often?

Matt: Yeah I was always adding new stuff, picked up a lot of stuff in second hand shops as well. So yeah, was always growing, is still growing.

Emily: Is your dad still? Have you got..?

Matt: Yeah, well, the model where we live is at my parents’ house. So he still looks after it. Has a play with it now and then. Yeah, Every time I go over there we spend hours playing with them. Never grow up!

Emily: Did you ever get these trains in, like you said, second hand condition, so they weren’t always new.

Matt: Yeah, there was a local shop just down the road from here, where um, my dad’s friend worked there so we went there all the time to buy second hand trains. Couldn’t resist buying second hand trains from there.

Emily: Did many of your friends play with the same kinds of things, or was it kind of a..

Matt: Yeah, my friends never quite, at least from what I can remember, played with trains very much. Seemed to be my thing. I took ages to grow out of them as well. I think I was quite a slow social developer so I still liked playing with my Thomas trains until I was about 13, 14, I think. So, yeah. No I think it was just more of a solo thing for me.

Emily: And you say you have a vivid imagination, would that be with the train sets as well?

Matt: Yeah. Especially with the Thomas ones I had I was always making up stories as well. It was a lot of fun.

Emily: How did you get into Thomas the Tank Engine?

Matt: Gosh, I just think, it must have been from watching it on tele or my parents buying me videos. I mean, I can remember being obsessed with Thomas the Tank Engine for as long as I can remember.

Emily: Yeah, and it wasn’t just Thomas was it? It was an array of..

Matt: Yeah. All trains. Especially like, my parents couldn’t take me anywhere without there being a train there and me going crazy about it. So yeah.

Emily: That must have been cool, the way that you could have a train and then go and see a real version. Is that something that you did?

Matt: Yeah. I used to love it when my parents would take me to the Bluebell Railway quite a lot. So yeah, I got very excited.

ENDS 3m 51sec

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3rd September 2014
Location: Brighton Toy and Model Museum
Interviewer – Emily Hill
Videographer – Sam Humphreys

Matt: I was born in Brighton back in 1991

Emily: You say you live in Wales now? Did you spend your childhood in Brighton?

Matt: Yeah, I lived in Brighton my whole life, up until last year when I moved to Wales.

Emily: Do you remember any particular toy that you can talk about?

0.20 – Matt: Yeah, I had a lot of Lego and stuff. I think before Lego, the childhood. I think they’re called Duplo or something like that, the bigger blocks. I had a lot of fun with them.

Emily: So you played with Duplo, when you were, as you say, younger?

Matt: When I was younger, yeah, I had Duplo before moving on to Lego when I was a bit older.

Emily: And how did you come to own your Lego?

Matt: Lego. I think my brother had a lot of Lego. So I was always playing with that, and Christmas and birthday toys. Had hours of fun, still have hours of fun!

Emily: Did you ever remember Lego being advertised? Do you remember the kind of sets that you wanted?

Matt: I remember like looking through like, the Argos catalogue for Lego stuff, and stuff every year that I wanted. So yeah, that’s where I think that’s where I found most of the things, I don’t remember the others too much?

Emily: And was there a specific way you played with Lego?

Matt: I loved making things up, out of Lego, inventing things and then making up stories with whatever I was playing with.

Emily: What kind of things?

Matt: We had this one set that was, it was like pirate ships, and islands and stuff so a lot of pirate scenarios with that one. Or I used to make planes a lot as well and trains out of Lego, and made up things.

Emily: Cool. And how long would you, kind of, keep them together? Did you destroy them after every playtime or?

Matt: Yes, I was always dissembling everything I made and building something new.

Emily: So temporary?

Matt: Temporary constructions, inventions.

Emily: Did you play? Have you got any siblings? Did you play with them?

Matt: Yeah, I’ve got an older brother, yeah we used to play. Not so much. I used to prefer playing on my own. Making up my own stories.

Emily: Yeah, And how did you feel about the Lego? Was it one of your favourite toys or?

Matt: I feel like, I mean I preferred my trains I think. I was always playing with my trains. But, um, yeah I did enjoy the Lego a lot, I had loads. I had a big huge box of it so I was always making up stuff, it was a lot of fun. I’ve got a vivid imagination, so I used to make stuff up a lot.

Emily: And do you still have any of it?

Matt: Ah, gosh. I think some of it’s still in a box in my parents’ house potentially, I think a lot got sold at car boot sales. Yeah, the next generation can have fun with it.

2.39 – Emily: So you mentioned your train set. Can you tell me a bit more about that?

Matt: Yeah, well I have loved Thomas the Tank Engine since as long as I can remember, so I think that’s what got me into trains, and I’ve still got the very first Hornby train ever built. It’s a bright red tank engine, it still works, with these bright blue, yellow and red coaches and trucks. And I was hooked ever since. I’ve still got my model railway, I’m still adding to it. Yeah, I had some of the Hornby Thomas Trains and some of that as well. I’ve sold that all now, but, yeah, hours of fun with trains.

Emily: What kind of age did you begin to play with trains?

Matt: Um, gosh I’ve been playing with trains since as long as I can remember. I must have been one, if not less than one when I got my first train.

Emily: So it’s almost a life..

Matt: A lifelong thing.

Emily: Did you construct these train sets on your own or?

Matt: Yeah, my dad built most of them, uh, when I was little he used to help. As I grew up I started adding houses and such. But, yeah my dad did a lot of the technical stuff. I just played with it.

Emily: And they are electric?

Matt: Yeah. They’re electric, he used to wire them up.

Emily: Did you play with your brother, with the train sets?

Matt: My brother was never really into trains. It was more my thing. He was more of a.. he preferred his lego and such but yeah, trains were my thing.

Emily: What are your best memories of..?

Matt: I think just, the first house I grew up in. where we had our train set in the attic. So just going up there with Dad. Playing with trains for hours.

Emily: And there was a collection that you added to often?

Matt: Yeah I was always adding new stuff, picked up a lot of stuff in second hand shops as well. So yeah, was always growing, is still growing.

Emily: Is your dad still? Have you got..?

Matt: Yeah, well, the model where we live is at my parents’ house. So he still looks after it. Has a play with it now and then. Yeah, Every time I go over there we spend hours playing with them. Never grow up!

Emily: Did you ever get these trains in, like you said, second hand condition, so they weren’t always new.

Matt: Yeah, there was a local shop just down the road from here, where um, my dad’s friend worked there so we went there all the time to buy second hand trains. Couldn’t resist buying second hand trains from there.

Emily: Did many of your friends play with the same kinds of things, or was it kind of a..

Matt: Yeah, my friends never quite, at least from what I can remember, played with trains very much. Seemed to be my thing. I took ages to grow out of them as well. I think I was quite a slow social developer so I still liked playing with my Thomas trains until I was about 13, 14, I think. So, yeah. No I think it was just more of a solo thing for me.

Emily: And you say you have a vivid imagination, would that be with the train sets as well?

Matt: Yeah. Especially with the Thomas ones I had I was always making up stories as well. It was a lot of fun.

Emily: How did you get into Thomas the Tank Engine?

Matt: Gosh, I just think, it must have been from watching it on tele or my parents buying me videos. I mean, I can remember being obsessed with Thomas the Tank Engine for as long as I can remember.

Emily: Yeah, and it wasn’t just Thomas was it? It was an array of..

Matt: Yeah. All trains. Especially like, my parents couldn’t take me anywhere without there being a train there and me going crazy about it. So yeah.

Emily: That must have been cool, the way that you could have a train and then go and see a real version. Is that something that you did?

Matt: Yeah. I used to love it when my parents would take me to the Bluebell Railway quite a lot. So yeah, I got very excited.

6.29 – Emily: I wanted to ask you if you had any teddy bears?

Matt: Yeah, I mean, when I was younger I had loads and loads of teddy bears. But now I just have the one I got given by my great grandmother when I was about a few months old. It’s this little white lion, it’s a bit battered down. My Nan’s had to stitch him a new tail.

Emily: What kind of materials is he made of?

Matt: Um, I think he’s just fabric, can’t think of the word I’m looking for now, like standard fluffy cotton, or whatever.

Emily: And can you describe him, like sizewise.

Matt: Yeah, he’s about this size [gestures] and is on all fours, my Nan stitched a smile onto him because he always looked really depressed because he just had like the two whiskers, and he used to have black felt on his ears and feet but that’s long fallen off I think, and he’s got a little brown button nose. But all of the fabric’s come off that so it’s the bare button. He’s very well looked after, I still can’t sleep without him. Its really funny I have to have him there.

Emily: So you got him from your great grandmother, was it a birthday or Christmas or..?

Matt: I don’t think, I think she picked it up in a charity shop so goodness knows how old he is! But yeah, I’ve had him forever.

Emily: And as you said you still sleep with him?

Matt: I still sleep with him. I really struggle not to when he’s not there, so yeah.

Emily: Was there a point where you stopped playing with him? And kind of had him as a…

Matt: I never played with him, he was always just a cuddle sleep toy. Forever yeah.

Emily: Like a comfort toy?

Matt: Yeah definitely comfort. When he’s not there I really struggle to get to sleep properly it’s strange.

Emily: So it’s still a really important toy to you?

Matt: Definitely. I’m quite protective over him.

Emily: Do you think you’ll ever get rid of him?

Matt: I would never get rid of him, I couldn’t. I’d feel too guilty because he’s like one of my friends.

Emily: Do you have any particularly good memories with him?

Matt: He’s been all around the world with me, whenever I’ve gone on holiday he’s always come with me so yeah he’s seen quite a lot of the world. But, um, he lost his tail in a fight with my cousin actually, which is why my nan knitted him a new one.

Emily: Can you tell me more about that? Were you playing?

Matt: We were on holiday in France I think and she was just winding me up and she had him by the tail and I had him by the body and we were pulling and the tail just came clean off. And I was quite upset so Nan, bless her, knitted him a brand new tail, so it’s all ok now.

8.58 – Emily: She fixed him. Were there any dolls that you used to play with?

Matt: Yeah, my mum gave me My Little Ponies to play with. Because she had a friend that didn’t believe in gender specific toys and so she like followed that. I think I had like Puppy in My Pockets as well.

Emily: do you remember thinking that these were specifically ‘girls’ toys as the time?

Matt: I think at the back of my mind I kind of thought they were aimed at girls but it didn’t matter to me. Because I was always playing with my cousin’s Barbie’s as well, no one stopped me or told me not to because they’re for girls so it was normal for me.

Emily: And this wasn’t something you might notice among your peers or..?

Matt: It wasn’t unusual, for me and no one ever told me it was unusual until a bit later in life so it was normal for me.

Emily: So these toys were at your cousin’s house, they weren’t..?

Matt: The ponies were mine, but um the Barbies, yeah, whenever I went to go see my cousin I started playing with her Barbies.

Emily: Can you describe the ponies? The material?

Matt: Yeah the ponies were made of plastic, I think it was synthetic hair, I think we might have had some that would change colour under different temperature water.

Emily: Would you play with these as you say, with your cousins?

Matt: Yeah, and my brother played with them as well. It was normal for us, I think he cottoned onto it a little bit as he grew up because I used to like talk about the things I’d play with, and he’d say ‘Don’t do that, they’re for girls!’

Emily: Did you kind of play with these toys with other toys?

Matt: Yeah I think, I’m trying to remember now, but I think there would have been collaborations with other toys. In fact with the ponies, when I was in the bath, they used to have to try to get on a journey around the bath while being like battered by tidal waves.

Emily: Do you remember how you came to own these ponies?

Matt: I think they were all just Christmas or birthday presents or stuff my mum had picked up in charity shops. I had loads of toys that I can only assume came from birthdays and Christmases.

Emily: And you don’t still have them?

Matt: No. I think they’re long gone now. I’m sure to better homes.

Emily: Is there a time you remember stopping playing with these toys?

Matt: Yeah, I used to play with toys right up to until I was like a young teenager. I could probably still sit down and play with toys for ages.

11.22 – Emily: Did you have any action figures?

Matt: No I never had action figures, I remember playing with like Stretch Armstrong and Action Man at my friends’ houses but I never had – I never really wanted them.

Emily: And your brother?

Matt: No my brother didn’t either. From what I can remember. I did have like um little army tanks and army sets and all different stuff I liked playing with. Never actual action figures.

Emily: Your imagination games, I’m wondering would they be gendered in terms of kind of action?

Matt: I don’t know, I think like the stories I would make up with the trains, were always just like the Thomas the tank engine stories we had. I just used to make up my own scenarios. It was just like really normal stuff.

Emily: Do you have any other toys that you can specifically remember?

Matt: I’m trying to remember now if I had any specific. I think I’ve covered most of them.

Emily: Did you ever want any toy, doll or construction set that you didn’t get? Did you see adverts or friends playing?

Matt: Do you know what there’s nothing I can think of, I think I was quite lucky with my childhood. It was quite privileged so I can’t think of anything. There was always trains that I wanted but I can’t think of anything I wanted specifically that I didn’t have.

Emily: Are there any other memories of toys you would like to talk about?

Matt: I think we’ve covered all of them.

ENDS 13m 08sec

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3rd September 2014
Location: Brighton Toy and Model Museum
Interviewer –Emily Hill
Videographer – Sam Humphreys

Emily: This is Emily Hill interviewing Matt Cooke for the Toys in the Community Project. So can I begin with asking you where you were born and when?

Matt: I was born in Brighton back in 1991

Emily: You say you live in Wales now? Did you spend your childhood in Brighton? Matt: Yeah, I lived in Brighton my whole life, up until last year when I moved to Wales. Emily: Do you remember any particular toy that you can talk about?

0.28 – Matt: Yeah, I had a lot of Lego and stuff. I think before Lego, the childhood. I think they’re called Duplo or something like that, the bigger blocks. I had a lot of fun with them.

Emily: So you played with Duplo, when you were, as you say, younger?

Matt: When I was younger, yeah, I had Duplo before moving on to Lego when I was a bit older.

Emily: And how did you come to own your Lego?

Matt: Lego. I think my brother had a lot of Lego. So I was always playing with that, and Christmas and birthday toys. Had hours of fun, still have hours of fun!

Emily: Did you ever remember Lego being advertised? Do you remember the kind of sets that you wanted?

Matt: I remember like looking through like, the Argos catalogue for Lego stuff, and stuff every year that I wanted. So yeah, that’s where I think that’s where I found most of the things, I don’t remember the others too much?

Emily: And was there a specific way you played with Lego?

Matt: I loved making things up, out of Lego, inventing things and then making up stories with whatever I was playing with.

Emily: What kind of things?

Matt: We had this one set that was, it was like pirate ships, and islands and stuff so a lot of pirate scenarios with that one. Or I used to make planes a lot as well and trains out of Lego, and made up things.

Emily: Cool. And how long would you, kind of, keep them together? Did you destroy them after every playtime or?

Matt: Yes, I was always dissembling everything I made and building something new.

Emily: So temporary?

Matt: Temporary constructions, inventions.

Emily: Did you play? Have you got any siblings? Did you play with them?

Matt: Yeah, I’ve got an older brother, yeah we used to play. Not so much. I used to prefer playing on my own. Making up my own stories.

Emily: Yeah, And how did you feel about the Lego? Was it one of your favourite toys or?

Matt: I feel like, I mean I preferred my trains I think. I was always playing with my trains. But, um, yeah I did enjoy the Lego a lot, I had loads. I had a big huge box of it so I was always making up stuff, it was a lot of fun. I’ve got a vivid imagination, so I used to make stuff up a lot.

Emily: And do you still have any of it?

Matt: Ah, gosh. I think some of it’s still in a box in my parents’ house potentially, I think a lot got sold at car boot sales. Yeah, the next generation can have fun with it.

2.58 – Emily: So you mentioned your train set. Can you tell me a bit more about that?

Matt: Yeah, well I have loved Thomas the Tank Engine since as long as I can remember, so I think that’s what got me into trains, and I’ve still got the very first Hornby train ever built. It’s a bright red tank engine, it still works, with these bright blue, yellow and red coaches and trucks. And I was hooked ever since. I’ve still got my model railway, I’m still adding to it. Yeah, I had some of the Hornby Thomas Trains and some of that as well. I’ve sold that all now, but, yeah, hours of fun with trains.

Emily: What kind of age did you begin to play with trains?

Matt: Um, gosh I’ve been playing with trains since as long as I can remember. I must have been one, if not less than one when I got my first train.

Emily: So it’s almost a life..

Matt: A lifelong thing.

Emily: Did you construct these train sets on your own or?

Matt: Yeah, my dad built most of them, uh, when I was little he used to help. As I grew up I started adding houses and such. But, yeah my dad did a lot of the technical stuff. I just played with it.

Emily: And they are electric?

Matt: Yeah. They’re electric, he used to wire them up.

Emily: Did you play with your brother, with the train sets?

Matt: My brother was never really into trains. It was more my thing. He was more of a.. he preferred his lego and such but yeah, trains were my thing.

Emily: What are your best memories of..?

Matt: I think just, the first house I grew up in. where we had our train set in the attic. So just going up there with Dad. Playing with trains for hours.

Emily: And there was a collection that you added to often?

Matt: Yeah I was always adding new stuff, picked up a lot of stuff in second hand shops as well. So yeah, was always growing, is still growing.

Emily: Is your dad still? Have you got..?

Matt: Yeah, well, the model where we live is at my parents’ house. So he still looks after it. Has a play with it now and then. Yeah, Every time I go over there we spend hours playing with them. Never grow up!

Emily: Did you ever get these trains in, like you said, second hand condition, so they weren’t always new.

Matt: Yeah, there was a local shop just down the road from here, where um, my dad’s friend worked there so we went there all the time to buy second hand trains. Couldn’t resist buying second hand trains from there.

Emily: Did many of your friends play with the same kinds of things, or was it kind of a..

Matt: Yeah, my friends never quite, at least from what I can remember, played with trains very much. Seemed to be my thing. I took ages to grow out of them as well. I think I was quite a slow social developer so I still liked playing with my Thomas trains until I was about 13, 14, I think. So, yeah. No I think it was just more of a solo thing for me.

Emily: And you say you have a vivid imagination, would that be with the train sets as well?

Matt: Yeah. Especially with the Thomas ones I had I was always making up stories as well. It was a lot of fun.

Emily: How did you get into Thomas the Tank Engine?

Matt: Gosh, I just think, it must have been from watching it on tele or my parents buying me videos. I mean, I can remember being obsessed with Thomas the Tank Engine for as long as I can remember.

Emily: Yeah, and it wasn’t just Thomas was it? It was an array of..

Matt: Yeah. All trains. Especially like, my parents couldn’t take me anywhere without there being a train there and me going crazy about it. So yeah.

Emily: That must have been cool, the way that you could have a train and then go and see a real version. Is that something that you did?

Matt: Yeah. I used to love it when my parents would take me to the Bluebell Railway quite a lot. So yeah, I got very excited.

6.48 – Emily: I wanted to ask you if you had any teddy bears?

Matt: Yeah, I mean, when I was younger I had loads and loads of teddy bears. But now I just have the one I got given by my great grandmother when I was about a few months old. It’s this little white lion, it’s a bit battered down. My Nan’s had to stitch him a new tail.

Emily: What kind of materials is he made of?

Matt: Um, I think he’s just fabric, can’t think of the word I’m looking for now, like standard fluffy cotton, or whatever.

Emily: And can you describe him, like sizewise.

Matt: Yeah, he’s about this size [gestures] and is on all fours, my Nan stitched a smile onto him because he always looked really depressed because he just had like the two whiskers, and he used to have black felt on his ears and feet but that’s long fallen off I think, and he’s got a little brown button nose. But all of the fabric’s come off that so it’s the bare button. He’s very well looked after, I still can’t sleep without him. Its really funny I have to have him there.

Emily: So you got him from your great grandmother, was it a birthday or Christmas or..?

Matt: I don’t think, I think she picked it up in a charity shop so goodness knows how old he is! But yeah, I’ve had him forever.

Emily: And as you said you still sleep with him?

Matt: I still sleep with him. I really struggle not to when he’s not there, so yeah.

Emily: Was there a point where you stopped playing with him? And kind of had him as a…

Matt: I never played with him, he was always just a cuddle sleep toy. Forever yeah.

Emily: Like a comfort toy?

Matt: Yeah definitely comfort. When he’s not there I really struggle to get to sleep properly it’s strange.

Emily: So it’s still a really important toy to you?

Matt: Definitely. I’m quite protective over him.

Emily: Do you think you’ll ever get rid of him?

Matt: I would never get rid of him, I couldn’t. I’d feel too guilty because he’s like one of my friends.

Emily: Do you have any particularly good memories with him?

Matt: He’s been all around the world with me, whenever I’ve gone on holiday he’s always come with me so yeah he’s seen quite a lot of the world. But, um, he lost his tail in a fight with my cousin actually, which is why my nan knitted him a new one.

Emily: Can you tell me more about that? Were you playing?

Matt: We were on holiday in France I think and she was just winding me up and she had him by the tail and I had him by the body and we were pulling and the tail just came clean off. And I was quite upset so Nan, bless her, knitted him a brand new tail, so it’s all ok now.

9.27 – Emily: She fixed him. Were there any dolls that you used to play with?

Matt: Yeah, my mum gave me My Little Ponies to play with. Because she had a friend that didn’t believe in gender specific toys and so she like followed that. I think I had like Puppy in My Pockets as well.

Emily: do you remember thinking that these were specifically ‘girls’ toys as the time?

Matt: I think at the back of my mind I kind of thought they were aimed at girls but it didn’t matter to me. Because I was always playing with my cousin’s Barbie’s as well, no one stopped me or told me not to because they’re for girls so it was normal for me.

Emily: And this wasn’t something you might notice among your peers or..?

Matt: It wasn’t unusual, for me and no one ever told me it was unusual until a bit later in life so it was normal for me.

Emily: So these toys were at your cousin’s house, they weren’t..?

Matt: The ponies were mine, but um the Barbies, yeah, whenever I went to go see my cousin I started playing with her Barbies.

Emily: Can you describe the ponies? The material?

Matt: Yeah the ponies were made of plastic, I think it was synthetic hair, I think we might have had some that would change colour under different temperature water.

Emily: Would you play with these as you say, with your cousins?

Matt: Yeah, and my brother played with them as well. It was normal for us, I think he cottoned onto it a little bit as he grew up because I used to like talk about the things I’d play with, and he’d say ‘Don’t do that, they’re for girls!’

Emily: Did you kind of play with these toys with other toys?

Matt: Yeah I think, I’m trying to remember now, but I think there would have been collaborations with other toys. In fact with the ponies, when I was in the bath, they used to have to try to get on a journey around the bath while being like battered by tidal waves.

Emily: Do you remember how you came to own these ponies?

Matt: I think they were all just Christmas or birthday presents or stuff my mum had picked up in charity shops. I had loads of toys that I can only assume came from birthdays and Christmases.

Emily: And you don’t still have them?

Matt: No. I think they’re long gone now. I’m sure to better homes. Emily: Is there a time you remember stopping playing with these toys?

Matt: Yeah, I used to play with toys right up to until I was like a young teenager. I could probably still sit down and play with toys for ages.

12.03 – Emily: Did you have any action figures?

Matt: No I never had action figures, I remember playing with like Stretch Armstrong and Action Man at my friends’ houses but I never had – I never really wanted them.

Emily: And your brother?

Matt: No my brother didn’t either. From what I can remember. I did have like um little army tanks and army sets and all different stuff I liked playing with. Never actual action figures.

Emily: Your imagination games, I’m wondering would they be gendered in terms of kind of action?

Matt: I don’t know, I think like the stories I would make up with the trains, were always just like the Thomas the tank engine stories we had. I just used to make up my own scenarios. It was just like really normal stuff.

Emily: Do you have any other toys that you can specifically remember?

Matt: I’m trying to remember now if I had any specific. I think I’ve covered most of them.

Emily: Did you ever want any toy, doll or construction set that you didn’t get? Did you see adverts or friends playing?

Matt: Do you know what there’s nothing I can think of, I think I was quite lucky with my childhood. It was quite privileged so I can’t think of anything. There was always trains that I wanted but I can’t think of anything I wanted specifically that I didn’t have.

Emily: Are there any other memories of toys you would like to talk about?

Matt: I think we’ve covered all of them.

Emily: Thanks for participating.

Matt: Thank you for having me

INTERVIEW ENDS 14m 02sec

Matt

Matt was born in Brighton in 1991 and has lived in Brighton most of his life. In the short version (3m 51s)of his interview he discusses his train set. In the full version (13m 08s) he also talks about Lego, his cuddly lion and My Little Pony.