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3rd February 2015
Location: Brighton Toy and Model Museum
Interviewer – Holly Parsons
Videographer – Andrea Dumbrell

00.06 – Hazel: So the doll I mainly played with was the doll that my mum had which must have been from about 1950s. And it was plastic and it had those marbley eyes with eyelashes. So it was my mum’s doll that she had since her childhood, and my sister played with it and me. And we all gave it a different name, so my mum called it Ruby, and I called it Diana which I think retrospectively was because of Princess Diana who was obviously around a lot in the 90s. She had, she was missing a foot where my uncle had sawn it off in an act of childish revenge I think. But we loved her anyway. My mum still has her and keeps her in a cot.

Holly: So do you want to tell me about your trolls?

Hazel: Yes, Yeah so I had about 120 or so. They were all different types, so I had you know doctors and everything. I used to like doing their hair that was a big thing, different hair styles. I used to carry them around in a bag and I even made a passport for them. So when, we, when I took them places, I would make a passport stamp about where they had been, by bag or by bus. You know the mode of transport was very important. And they all had different names which I used to remember, I used to you know reel off 50 or 60 troll names.

Holly: So how did you come to own your trolls?
Hazel: I used to, I don’t know how I got my first one, but I used to go round charity shops and collect them, and my mum used to work in a charity shop for a while, and I used to love rummaging and of course they were affordable for me, they were just 20p or something, so I used to just collect them. And the more unusual they were the better, and with anything when you start getting a collection people, you know, will donate, so they came in from everywhere.

Holly: So you spoke about how unusual they were. What was the most usual one that you remember?

Hazel: I had a proper Dam one from Denmark.

Holly: That’s very nice. So how did you play with the trolls?

Hazel: Hairstyles, like I said, you know, lots of pretend play, lots of conversation, you know, let’s go and see the doctor troll. There was a vicar, I had a vicar who used to marry people, used to marry the trolls, that was good. I had a dinosaur, he was cool, rainbow hair.

Holly: A dinosaur troll? Hazel: Uhum

Holly: That’s a bit weird, in my head, I’ve got different pictures now of dinosaurs and trolls having babies. So how do you feel about your trolls?

Hazel: I used to have the most affection for them. But I mean, like I say I’ve still got them. I don’t think I will get them out and do anything with them. But I can’t, it’s almost, I don’t want to get rid of them because they were such a part of my childhood. And I like to think that my kids one day, might want to play with them, carefully and with precision.

Holly: Gloves.

ENDS 3m 17s

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3rd February 2015
Location: Brighton Toy and Model Museum
Interviewer – Holly Parsons
Videographer – Andrea Dumbrell

00.05 – Hazel: I was born in Brighton in 1988.

Holly: Excellent. Where did you spend your childhood?

Hazel: In Brighton, in Hangleton.

00.14 – Holly: Excellent. So teddy bears, did you have a teddy bear?

Hazel: I didn’t, I didn’t have them. Teddy bears weren’t really my thing. I had a doll that I used to play with that was also my mothers. But my big thing was trolls, they were my absolute favourite thing in the world. And I had a collection of about 150, which are still in my mother’s loft because I have a big attachment to them still.

Holly: So if you didn’t have a bear, did you have any other cuddly animals that you can remember?

Hazel: No.

00.52 – Holly: OK I will move on to dolls then, when I find the right sheet of paper. What dolls did you play with?

Hazel: So the doll I mainly played with was the doll that my mum had which must have been from about 1950s. And it was plastic and it had those marbley eyes with eyelashes.

So it was my mum’s doll that she had since her childhood, and my sister played with it and me. And we all gave it a different name, so my mum called it Ruby, and I called it Diana which I think retrospectively was because of Princess Diana who was obviously around a lot in the 90s. She had, she was missing a foot where my uncle had sawn it off in an act of childish revenge I think. But we loved her anyway. My mum still has her and keeps her in a cot.

Holly: So, did you remember how you used to play with Diana?

Hazel: Yes I used to pretend like she was my baby, and I take her around with me. I remember taking her on holiday and I remember my nephew playing with her and he was only about one and a half to two and I remember when he was playing with the baby they were the same height, which was quite cute.

Holly: So how did you feel about Diana?

Hazel: She was great.

Holly: And your mum still has it. What are your best memories of her?

Hazel: Dressing her up, got some good outfits, I suppose taking her out, when I went out. 02.48 –

Holly: So did you have any action figures?

Hazel: No, I didn’t have any Barbies, Barbies weren’t really my thing.

02.57 – Holly: So would you consider trolls to be dolls?

Hazel: Yeah.

Holly: So do you want to tell me about your trolls?

Hazel: Yes, Yeah so I had about 120 or so. They were all different types, so I had you know doctors and everything. I used to like doing their hair that was a big thing, different hair styles. I used to carry them around in a bag and I even made a passport for them. So when, we, when I took them places, I would make a passport stamp about where they had been, by bag or by bus. You know the mode of transport was very important. And they all had different names which I used to remember, I used to you know reel off 50 or 60 troll names.

Holly: So how did you come to own your trolls?

Hazel: I used to, I don’t know how I got my first one, but I used to go round charity shops and collect them, and my mum used to work in a charity shop for a while, and I used to love rummaging and of course they were affordable for me, they were just 20p or something, so I used to just collect them. And the more unusual they were the better, and with anything when you start getting a collection people, you know, will donate, so they came in from everywhere.

Holly: So you spoke about how unusual they were. What was the most usual one that you remember?

Hazel: I had a proper Dam one from Denmark.

Holly: That’s very nice. So how did you play with the trolls?

Hazel: Hairstyles, like I said, you know, lots of pretend play, lots of conversation, you know, lets go and see the doctor troll. There was a vicar, I had a vicar who used to marry people, used to marry the trolls, that was good. I had a dinosaur, he was cool, rainbow hair.

Holly: A dinosaur troll?

Hazel: Uhum

Holly: That’s a bit weird, in my head, I’ve got different pictures now of dinosaurs and trolls having babies. So how do you feel about your trolls?

Hazel: I used to have the most affection for them. But I mean, like I say I’ve still got them. I don’t think I will get them out and do anything with them. But I can’t, it’s almost, I don’t want to get rid of them because they were such a part of my childhood. And I like to think that my kids one day, might want to play with them, carefully and with precision.

Holly: Gloves. So how important were the trolls to you?

Hazel: They were very important, they were my main toys.

Holly: And you still have got them in the loft.

Hazel: Umm.

Holly: What are your best memories of the trolls?

Hazel: I don’t know.

05.43 – Holly: That’s fine. So we will move on to construction toys. So did you have any construction toys that you played with?

Hazel: I played with Lego. A lot. And Meccano. We had Meccano with batteries.

Holly: Meccano with batteries tell me about that.

Hazel: Well, we got, they were like sets. I think we had a car and you could like build it in, and it had like plastic that you could fold over and put a battery in, it was like a remote controlled car. That was really cool, I really liked that.

Holly: So how did you come to own the Meccano?

Hazel: The Meccano was given to my brother for Christmas, Lego was again was my brother’s, but my aunty actually had a huge collection of Lego. She had so much Lego.

Holly: So how did you play with it, and who with?

Hazel: Ah with the Lego we took it very seriously, we had a big piece of plywood that we painted a road on that ended in a beach and it had plots for each of the houses. And we used to build, like all of us, like me and my brothers and my aunty used to build all of the houses and used to put them on the street and we used to put a pirate ship in the sea. And then we used to leave it up for a week or so and, you know used to play with it like a city.

Holly: How about the Meccano? How did you used to play with that?

Hazel: Just, you know building it as it was, playing with it, taking it apart and making our own unique creation.

Holly: So how did you feel about the Meccano or the Lego?

Hazel: I liked it. I most liked the ones that were specifically built for something. I didn’t, I wasn’t, with Lego, I wasn’t, I didn’t want to make my own stuff I wanted to follow the pattern and make what it was. And even now I like the houses.

Holly: So do you still have any of the Meccano or the Lego?

Hazel: Well all of the Lego got sold because you know when you grow up you want to get rid of all your toys and then you regret it instantly. So I have started re buying Lego sets, I bought a beach house last year.

Holly: That’s fine, I’m looking at the Back to the Future Car at the moment. It is £50. What are your best memories of playing Lego or Meccano?

Hazel: Probably, that, probably us all being around. Going up and down this road.

08.10 – Holly: Did you ever mix any of your toys up so play with Lego and trolls at the same time?

Hazel: No, no, no, no, no, no.

Holly: We have come to the end of my questions. Did you ever have teddy bear, doll or construction toy that you couldn’t have, one that you had seen in the shop that you wanted but you never got?

Hazel: I didn’t really have any Barbies because they were too expensive.

Holly: Did you want Barbies though?

Hazel: At the time I wanted a Barbie but now I think I had much more interesting toys.

Holly: Are there are other memories of teddy bears, dolls or construction toys that you want to share with us?

Hazel: No.

Holly: Excellent. Thank you for participating.

INTERVIEW ENDS 8m 55s

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Read the transcript of the audio track

3rd February 2015
Location: Brighton Toy and Model Museum
Interviewer – Holly Parsons
Videographer – Andrea Dumbrell

Holly: Right so hello Hazel. Are you happy for me to address you as Hazel?

Hazel: Yeah

Holly: OK. So today we are going to interview you about toys, bears and construction toys. if there are any other toys that you had, that you want to talk about we can fit that in as well. So our opening questions is where were you born and when?

00.24 – Hazel: I was born in Brighton in 1988.
Holly: Excellent. Where did you spend your childhood?
Hazel: In Brighton, in Hangleton.
00.34 – Holly: Excellent. So teddy bears, did you have a teddy bear?

Hazel: I didn’t, I didn’t have them. Teddy bears weren’t really my thing. I had a doll that I used to play with that was also my mothers. But my big thing was trolls, they were my absolute favourite thing in the world. And I had a collection of about 150, which are still in my mother’s loft because I have a big attachment to them still.

Holly: So if you didn’t have a bear, did you have any other cuddly animals that you can remember?

Hazel: No.

01.13 – Holly: OK I will move on to dolls then, when I find the right sheet of paper. What dolls did you play with?

Hazel: So the doll I mainly played with was the doll that my mum had which must have been from about 1950s. And it was plastic and it had those marbley eyes with eyelashes. So it was my mum’s doll that she had since her childhood, and my sister played with it and me. And we all gave it a different name, so my mum called it Ruby, and I called it Diana which I think retrospectively was because of Princess Diana who was obviously around a lot in the 90s. She had, she was missing a foot where my uncle had sawn it off in an act of childish revenge I think. But we loved her anyway. My mum still has her and keeps her in a cot.

Holly: So, did you remember how you used to play with Diana?

Hazel: Yes I used to pretend like she was my baby, and I take her around with me. I remember taking her on holiday and I remember my nephew playing with her and he was only about one and a half to two and I remember when he was playing with the baby they were the same height, which was quite cute.

Holly: So how did you feel about Diana?
Hazel: She was great.
Holly: And your mum still has it. What are your best memories of her?
Hazel: Dressing her up, got some good outfits, I suppose taking her out, when I went out. Holly: So did you have any action figures?
03:12 – Hazel: No, I didn’t have any Barbies, Barbies weren’t really my thing.
Holly: So would you consider trolls to be dolls?
Hazel: Yeah.
Holly: So do you want to tell me about your trolls?

Hazel: Yes, Yeah so I had about 120 or so. They were all different types, so I had you know doctors and everything. I used to like doing their hair that was a big thing, different hair styles. I used to carry them around in a bag and I even made a passport for them. So when, we, when I took them places, I would make a passport stamp about where they had been, by bag or by bus. You know the mode of transport was very important. And they all had different names which I used to remember, I used to you know reel off 50 or 60 troll names.

Holly: So how did you come to own your trolls?

Hazel: I used to, I don’t know how I got my first one, but I used to go round charity shops and collect them, and my mum used to work in a charity shop for a while, and I used to love rummaging and of course they were affordable for me, they were just 20p or something, so I used to just collect them. And the more unusual they were the better, and with anything when you start getting a collection people, you know, will donate, so they came in from everywhere.

Holly: So you spoke about how unusual they were. What was the most usual one that you remember?

Hazel: I had a proper Dam one from Denmark.

Holly: That’s very nice. So how did you play with the trolls?

Hazel: Hairstyles, like I said, you know, lots of pretend play, lots of conversation, you know, lets go and see the doctor troll. There was a vicar, I had a vicar who used to marry people, used to marry the trolls, that was good. I had a dinosaur, he was cool, rainbow hair.

Holly: A dinosaur troll? Hazel: Uhum

Holly: That’s a bit weird, in my head, I’ve got different pictures now of dinosaurs and trolls having babies. So how do you feel about your trolls?

Hazel: I used to have the most affection for them. But I mean, like I say I’ve still got them. I don’t think I will get them out and do anything with them. But I can’t, it’s almost, I don’t want to get rid of them because they were such a part of my childhood. And I like to think that my kids one day, might want to play with them, carefully and with precision.

Holly: Gloves. So how important were the trolls to you?
Hazel: They were very important, they were my main toys. Holly: And you still have got them in the loft.
Hazel: Umm.

Holly: What are your best memories of the trolls?
Hazel: I don’t know.

06.04 – Holly: That’s fine. So we will move on to construction toys. So did you have any construction toys that you played with?

Hazel: I played with Lego. A lot. And Meccano. We had Meccano with batteries.

Holly: Meccano with batteries tell me about that.

Hazel: Well, we got, they were like sets. I think we had a car and you could like build it in, and it had like plastic that you could fold over and put a battery in, it was like a remote controlled car. That was really cool, I really liked that.

Holly: So how did you come to own the Meccano?
Hazel: The Meccano was given to my brother for Christmas, Lego was again was my brother’s, but my aunty actually had a huge collection of Lego. She had so much Lego.

Holly: So how did you play with it, and who with?

Hazel: Ah with the Lego we took it very seriously, we had a big piece of plywood that we painted a road on that ended in a beach and it had plots for each of the houses. And we used to build, like all of us, like me and my brothers and my aunty used to build all of the houses and used to put them on the street and we used to put a pirate ship in the sea. And then we used to leave it up for a week or so and, you know used to play with it like a city.

Holly: How about the Meccano? How did you used to play with that?
Hazel: Just, you know building it as it was, playing with it, taking it apart and making our own unique creation.

Holly: So how did you feel about the Meccano or the Lego?

Hazel: I liked it, I most liked the ones that were specifically built for something. I didn’t, I wasn’t, with Lego, I wasn’t, I didn’t want to make my own stuff I wanted to follow the pattern and make what it was. And even now I like the houses.

Holly: So do you still have any of the Meccano or the Lego?

Hazel: Well all of the Lego got sold because you know when you grow up you want to get rid of all your toys and then you regret it instantly. So I have started re buying Lego sets, I bought a beach house last year.

Holly: That’s fine, I’m looking at the Back to the Future Car at the moment. It is £50. What are your best memories of playing Lego or Meccano?

Hazel: Probably, that, probably us all being around. Going up and down this road.
08.31 – Holly: Did you ever mix any of your toys up so play with Lego and trolls at the same time?

Hazel: No, no, no, no, no, no.

Holly: We have come to the end of my questions. Did you ever have teddy bear, doll or construction toy that you couldn’t have, one that you had seen in the shop that you wanted but you never got?

Hazel: I didn’t really have any Barbies because they were too expensive.

Holly: Did you want Barbies though?

Hazel: At the time I wanted a Barbie but now I think I had much more interesting toys.

Holly: Are there are other memories of teddy bears, dolls or construction toys that you want to share with us?

Hazel: No.
Holly: Excellent. Thank you for participating.

INTERVIEW ENDS 9m 15s

Hazel

Hazel was born in Brighton in 1988 and grew up in Hangleton. She had a collection of over 100 trolls. The short version (3m 17s) of her interview  focuses on her doll and her trolls. In the full version (8m 55s) she also discusses Meccano and Lego.