Read the transcript of this clip

16th September 2014 Location: Interviewee’s home
Interviewer: Andrea Dumbrell
Videographer – Dan Cash
Also present: Brian Bennett (Alice’s son)

00.02 – Andrea: Did you have a teddy bear?

Alice: Only a little teddy bear with no legs

Andrea: Why did it have no legs?

Alice: I suppose somebody must have given it to me. Somebody had finished with it I expect. And he had red, he had a grey top and red trousers.

Andrea: And can you remember how big he was? Was he a little bear or a big bear?

Alice: I’ll be awkward. Medium.

Andrea: [laughs] Okay. What was it made out of?

Alice: Some sort of material.

Andrea: And when it was given to you do you know if it was new or if it was already second hand?

Alice: It was second hand.

Andrea: So it was even older than that.

Alice: Yes, yes.

Andrea: And you said that someone gave it to you. Can you remember who?

Alice: No

Andrea: No

Alice: It was a long time ago.

Andrea: I know. And did you play games with him?

Alice: I expect so. I’m sure I did.

Andrea: Did he have a name?

Alice: No

Andrea: Most people’s teddies didn’t I think. They were just ‘teddy’ weren’t they?

Alice: Yes, that’s right.

Andrea: And can you remember how you felt about him? You obviously still remember him. So were you fond of him, did you like him?

Alice: Oh yes, he was a nice old chap. And he sat. I had a dolly. A nice dolly. And she had a cradle and teddy sat in the cradle with her.

Andrea: So the teddy and the dolly were friends then?

Alice: Yes they were.

Andrea: And you played games with them? He didn’t just sit there on his own watching you?

Alice: [over Andrea] Oh no, we played games. Pretending games

Andrea: And I assume you don’t still have him?

Alice: No

Andrea: So what do you think your best memory of him is? Alice: Of teddy?

Andrea: Of teddy

Alice: I don’t really know. I know he sat in the end of the cradle. Dolly was at one end. Teddy sat at the other end. He was like a brother to my dolly.

2.55 – Andrea: So tell me about your dolly then. What was she like?

Alice: She was nice. I had it for a Christmas present one year when I was quite young. The head was china. She had real hair. The head was china but the body was, in those days, it was a material body. And the one I had was black material body. But it was given to me with all the dolly clothes on.

Andrea: So again, what size was she? Was she the size of your hand, or bigger?

Alice: Quite big really. About like that [gestures]

Andrea: And you said she came with clothes. What sort of clothes did she have?

Alice: The old fashioned type of clothes.

Andrea: Mhm

Alice: My mother, she got her dressed in a white, like a baby’s christening robe that went all over. The funniest thing was, she had donkey’s ears bags. Do you know what that is?

Andrea: No, tell me.

Alice: I thought that might surprise you. It was, today we’d say knickers. But this was donkey’s ear bags. Used to tie them under the knee and a drawstring at the back. And they were generally known as donkey’s ear bags.

Andrea: I love that. I’ve never heard that term before. That’s lovely. [Laughter]. So who was she given to you by?

Alice: My mum. One Christmas

Andrea: Do you know how old you were when you got her?

Alice: I don’t know exactly, but I think I would have been about five.

Andrea: So you said she had a cradle as well?

Alice: Yes

Andrea: So she had a cradle and she had clothes. Did she have anything else?

Alice: A shawl. I wanted to take her out, I want to carry her.

Andrea: And how did you play with her?

Alice: Just pretend games. I sort of pretended she was real.

Andrea: Was she very important to you?

Alice: Yes she was when I was younger. In those days we didn’t have a lot of things. Yes, she was important.

Andrea: Do you know when you stopped having her? How long did you have her for?

6.05 – Alice: I’m not sure of the date. I had her until I was in the forces. And my mother gave her away to a little evacuee girl. When I came home my dolly had gone. So I’d have been 24.

Andrea: Okay. How did you feel about the doll being given away? Did you mind? Or?

Alice: I did really mind, I thought I should have been asked if she was going to be given away. But it was just done when I wasn’t there.

Andrea: Well hopefully the other little girl really liked it.

Alice: I expect she did. She hadn’t got anything. Her name – the name of the dolly was Violet

Andrea: Okay. That’s a lovely name.

Alice: My mother’s name for her.

Andrea: Did she have hair?

Alice: Yes she did.

Andrea: What was her hair like?

Alice: She had a fringe, and it came to about here [gestures chin length] on her face.

Andrea: What colour was her hair?

Alice: Well, what we call mousy brown

Andrea: And again, what would you say is your best memory of her?

Alice: I used to take her out and play with her. I didn’t have a dolly’s pram, but I did have this cradle. I used to take her out and make it up. Take her out and sort of tidy up the bed. Things like that. Tidy up the cradle.

Andrea: And did teddy use to go with her when you took her out?

Alice: I think he must have done. I can’t actually remember, but I’m sure he must have done.

08.30 – Andrea: I’ve just been passed this for you. I’ve just been passed Sunny Jim.

Alice: Oh yes, Sunny Jim, yes.

Andrea: Do you want to take him so the camera can see him?

Alice: Sunny Jim, yes. This isn’t the original one. I don’t know if you remember the cereal called Force do you? Well, when I was young we had it at home. And if you sent the packet tops and a small amount of money they sent you a Sunny Jim as featured on the box. I don’t know where that ended up. But years and years later they said people could send out and buy one. And I wanted one so badly, ‘cos I did like my Sunny Jim. So there you are. This is not the original of course.

Andrea: So did you have one as a child?

Alice: Yes. Yes I did. My mother got it for me.

Andrea: And did he come … Do you remember, did he come ready made, or did he have to be sewn together?

Alice: Oh no, he came just like that. This is an exact replica. Only this is much later in years. I couldn’t resist sending for him when they were advertising.

INTERVIEW ENDS 10m

Watch the full video

Read the transcript of the full video

16th September 2014
Location: Interviewee’s home
Interviewer: Andrea Dumbrell
Videographer – Dan Cash
Also present: Brian Bennett (Alice’s son)

00.03 – Andrea: So I’d like to start by asking can you tell us your name?

Alice: Alice

Andrea: And where were you born Alice?

Alice: I was born in Brighton. It wasn’t Matlock Road. It was a road off of Matlock Road.

Andrea: Okay. And what year was that?

Alice: You check that?

Brian: 1918

Alice: 1918

Andrea: 1918. Okay. And did you spend all your childhood in Brighton?

Alice: No. No.

Andrea: Where did you go?

Alice: Pyecombe.

Andrea: Okay.

Alice: My childhood was in Pyecombe.

Andrea: Okay. So how old were you when you went there? Can you remember?

Alice: Yes. We moved to Pycombe when I was four.

Andrea: Okay

Alice: And we were there the rest of the time.

Andrea: And did you have brothers or sisters?

Alice: Two brothers.

1.12 – Andrea: Okay. And did you have a teddy bear?

Alice: Only a little teddy bear with no legs

Andrea: Why did it have no legs?

Alice: I suppose somebody must have given it to me. Somebody had finished with it I expect. And he had red, he had a grey top and red trousers.

Andrea: And can you remember how big he was? Was he a little bear or a big bear?

Alice: I’ll be awkward. Medium.

Andrea: [laughs] Okay. What was it made out of?

Alice: Some sort of material.

Andrea: And when it was given to you do you know if it was new or if it was already second hand?

Alice: It was second hand.

Andrea: So it was even older than that.

Alice: Yes, yes.

Andrea: And you said that someone gave it to you. Can you remember who?

Alice: No

Andrea: No

Alice: It was a long time ago.

Andrea: I know. And did you play games with him?

Alice: I expect so. I’m sure I did.

Andrea: Did he have a name?

Alice: No

Andrea: Most people’s teddies didn’t I think. They were just ‘teddy’ weren’t they?

Alice: Yes, that’s right.

Andrea: And can you remember how you felt about him? You obviously still remember him. So were you fond of him, did you like him?

Alice: Oh yes, he was a nice old chap. And he sat. I had a dolly. A nice dolly. And she had a cradle and teddy sat in the cradle with her.

Andrea: So the teddy and the dolly were friends then?

Alice: Yes they were.

Andrea: And you played games with them? He didn’t just sit there on his own watching you?

Alice: [over Andrea] Oh no, we played games. Pretending games

Andrea: And I assume you don’t still have him?

Alice: No

Andrea: So what do you think your best memory of him is?

Alice: Of teddy?

Andrea: Of teddy

Alice: I don’t really know. I know he sat in the end of the cradle. Dolly was at one end. Teddy sat at the other end. He was like a brother to my dolly.

4.05 – Andrea: So tell me about your dolly then. What was she like?

Alice: She was nice. I had it for a Christmas present one year when I was quite young. The head was china. She had real hair. The head was china but the body was, in those days, it was a material body. And the one I had was black material body. But it was given to me with all the dolly clothes on.

Andrea: So again, what size was she? Was she the size of your hand, or bigger?

Alice: Quite big really. About like that [gestures]

Andrea: And you said she came with clothes. What sort of clothes did she have?

Alice: The old fashioned type of clothes.

Andrea: Mhm

Alice: My mother, she got her dressed in a white, like a baby’s christening robe that went all over. The funniest thing was, she had donkey’s ears bags. Do you know what that is?

Andrea: No, tell me.

Alice: I thought that might surprise you. It was, today we’d say knickers. But this was donkey’s ear bags. Used to tie them under the knee and a drawstring at the back. And they were generally known as donkey’s ear bags.

Andrea: I love that. I’ve never heard that term before. That’s lovely. [Laughter]. So who was she given to you by?

Alice: My mum. One Christmas

Andrea: Do you know how old you were when you got her?

Alice: I don’t know exactly, but I think I would have been about five.

Andrea: So you said she had a cradle as well?

Alice: Yes

Andrea: So she had a cradle and she had clothes. Did she have anything else?

Alice: A shawl. I wanted to take her out, I want to carry her.

Andrea: And how did you play with her?

Alice: Just pretend games. I sort of pretended she was real.

Andrea: Was she very important to you?

Alice: Yes she was when I was younger. In those days we didn’t have a lot of things. Yes, she was important.

Andrea: And again, I assume you don’t still have her?

Alice: No

Andrea: Do you know when you stopped having her? How long did you have her for?

Alice: I’m not sure of the date. I had her until I was in the forces. And my mother gave her away to a little evacuee girl. When I came home my dolly had gone. So I’d have been 24.

Andrea: Okay. How did you feel about the doll being given away? Did you mind? Or?

Alice: I did really mind, I thought I should have been asked if she was going to be given away. But it was just done when I wasn’t there.

Andrea: Well hopefully the other little girl really liked it.

Alice: I expect she did. She hadn’t got anything. Her name – the name of the dolly was Violet.

Andrea: Okay. That’s a lovely name.

Alice: My mother’s name for her.

Andrea: Did she have hair?

Alice: Yes she did.

Andrea: What was her hair like?

Alice: She had a fringe, and it came to about here [gestures] on her face.

Andrea: What colour was her hair?

Alice: Well, what we call mousy brown

Andrea: And again, what would you say is your best memory of her?

Alice: I used to take her out and play with her. I didn’t have a dolly’s pram, but I did have this cradle. I used to take her out and make it up. Take her out and sort of tidy up the bed. Things like that. Tidy up the cradle.

Andrea: And did teddy use to go with her when you took her out?

Alice: I think he must have done. I can’t actually remember, but I’m sure he must have done.

9.40 – Andrea: So, this is a bit of an odd question. Did you have any action figures? Any sort of other types of dolls, or anything that weren’t babies?

Alice: No, I don’t think I did, no.

Andrea: No, I assumed you wouldn’t. They’re a bit later I think, those. So is there anything else about your doll or your teddy that you can remember?

Alice: Not really.

10.14 – Andrea: Okay. So I’m going to ask you about construction toys. Did you have any construction toys? Things like bricks, or Meccano. Anything that you made things out of?

Alice: No, I didn’t, but the boys did. I didn’t.

Andrea: And were the boys older than you, or?

Alice: One was older and one was younger

Andrea: And what did they have?

Alice: Meccano. I don’t know what else. I remember Meccano.

Andrea: And did you ever play with it?

Alice: No. Weren’t allowed to. That was theirs.

Andrea: Did you want to play with it?

Alice: I wanted to be fiddling.

Andrea: You didn’t use to sneak in and play with it when they were out?

Alice: No, no.

Andrea: Do you remember how they played with it? Did they make things out of it, or?

Alice: Yes, yes. My eldest brother used to make things out of it.

Andrea: What sorts of things?

Alice: It’s a long time ago. They used to build bridges for one thing didn’t they, with Meccano?

Andrea: Did you have any bricks?

11.50 – Alice: Yes. I had something called – which I’d completely forgotten until you mentioned it – something called Wenebrix. And each piece slotted into each other. And you could make scenes with that.

Andrea: So what was that made out of?

Alice: Some sort of metal. Tin. Tin I’m sure.

Andrea: And you say you made scenes out of it. What sort of scenes?

Alice: Can’t remember, no …

Andrea: No. Maybe houses, or streets.

Alice: Houses, that’s right. Not streets I think. But I did make houses.

12.51 – Andrea: So you said you didn’t have many toys. Was there anything that you really wanted but you couldn’t have?

Alice: No, no.

Andrea: So you were quite happy just having a few toys?

Alice: Yes, yes. Nobody had lots of toys in those days. We all had a few favourite ones.

Andrea: So you had the bear, you had the doll, you had the cradle. Were there any other toys that you had that you can remember?

Alice: No, no.

13.40 – Andrea: I’ve just been passed this for you. I’ve just been passed Sunny Jim.

Alice: Oh yes, Sunny Jim, yes.

Andrea: Do you want to take him so the camera can see him?

Alice: Sunny Jim, yes. This isn’t the original one. I don’t know if you remember the cereal called Force do you? Well, when I was young we had it at home. And if you sent the packet tops and a small amount of money they sent you a Sunny Jim as featured on the box. I don’t know where that ended up. But years and years later they said people could send out and buy one. And I wanted one so badly, ‘cos I did like my Sunny Jim. So there you are. This is not the original of course.

Andrea: So did you have one as a child?

Alice: Yes. Yes I did. My mother got it for me.

Andrea: And did he come … Do you remember, did he come ready made, or did he have to be sewn together?

Alice: Oh no, he came just like that. This is an exact replica. Only this is much later in years. I couldn’t resist sending for him when they were advertising.

Andrea: Are there any other memories of dolls or bears or construction toys that you’d like to talk about? I know there’s a couple of other bears.

Alice: That’s the boys’ bears

Andrea: You can talk about the boys’ bears if you want. But any others of your own to start with?

15.38 – Alice: I did have a dolly’s cooking stove. And I was allowed to do a little bit of cooking on it. It was only a small thing. But you’d put a little bit of oil in and do half a dozen chips or something like that.

Andrea: So it did real cooking?

Alice: Yes

Andrea: And when you say it was a stove, was that putting stuff on the top of it or inside the stove?

Alice: It was both.

Andrea: Okay. And do you remember if your doll used to help you?

Alice: No

Andrea: Do you know where that came from? The stove? Do you know where it came from?

Alice: No

16.38 – Andrea: And just going back to your doll for a moment. You said your mother gave it to you.

Alice: Yes. One Christmas.

Andrea: One Christmas. So was she new, the doll?

Alice: Yes I think she was, yes.

16.52 – Andrea: Okay. I’ve been handed two bears

Alice: Is that Brunus?

Andrea: Shall I swap you? You pass me Sunny Jim, I’ll pass you this bear.

Alice: Hello Brunus

Andrea: Now you said this wasn’t your bear.

Alice: No. It was given to Brian when he was about a year old. This bear … the origin of it. They had one of these bears in London Zoo. And it was so unusual that they made these sort of things out of it. And this was given to Brian when he was about a year old.

Andrea: So what year was that?

Alice: 1949.

Andrea: He’s lovely isn’t he?

Alice: He’s gorgeous.

Andrea: So what’s he made out of?

Alice: I don’t know. He’s all soft. Stuffed with something. I don’t know what it is.

Andrea: So when Brian got him, was it furry, the bear?

Alice: Sorry?

Andrea: Was the bear furry when he was new?

Alice: Yes he was.

Andrea: So he’s been well loved.

Alice: Yes, he has.

Andrea: I’ve also been passed this bear. I don’t know who this is. Who’s this one?

Alice: That’s Michael’s teddy. He had that one Christmas when he was about a year old. When Michael was about a year. And I can remember as if it was yesterday. He sat up in his cot. It was Christmas. And then he looked up and picked it up and said ‘Oh, a teddy’. Just like that.

Andrea: So what year was that if Michael was a year?

Alice: Um. [pause]

Brian: 1953 because Michael was born in ‘52.

Andrea: 1953 I’ve just been told. Does that sound right?

Alice: Yes. The year of the coronation.

Andrea: So where did these two bears come from?

Alice: The little teddy came from the shop at Christmas time. And this one, some cousins came to see Brian and brought him that. There was only Brian in those days.

Andrea: They’re lovely bears. Thank you for showing them to the camera. I assume the camera can see them?

Dan: Yep.

Andrea: Good

Alice: Are you taking a photo of them?

Dan: Will do

20.15 – Andrea: We will, we will. So is there anything else you want to tell us about bears and dolls, or is that everything you can remember that you want to tell us?

Alice: I think that’s about all I can remember clearly.

INTERVIEW ENDS 20m 31s

Listen to the audio

Read the transcript of the audio track

16th September 2014
Location: Interviewee’s home
Interviewer: Andrea Dumbrell
Videographer – Dan Cash
Also present: Brian (Alice’s son)

Andrea: Can you tell us your name?

Alice: Alice

Andrea: And where were you born Alice?

Alice: I was born in Brighton. It wasn’t Matlock Road. It was a road off of Matlock Road.

Andrea: Okay. And what year was that?

Alice: You check that?

Brian: 1918

Alice: 1918

Andrea: 1918. Okay. And did you spend all your childhood in Brighton?

Alice: No. No.

Andrea: Where did you go?

Alice: Pyecombe.

Andrea: Okay.

Alice: My childhood was in Pyecombe.

Andrea: Okay. So how old were you when you went there? Can you remember?

Alice: Yes. We moved to Pycombe when I was four.

Andrea: Okay

Alice: And we were there the rest of the time.

Andrea: And did you have brothers or sisters?

Alice: Two brothers.

01.04 – Andrea: Okay. And did you have a teddy bear?

Alice: Only a little teddy bear with no legs

Andrea: Why did it have no legs?

Alice: I suppose somebody must have given it to me. Somebody had finished with it I expect. And he had red, he had a grey top and red trousers.

Andrea: And can you remember how big he was? Was he a little bear or a big bear?

Alice: I’ll be awkward. Medium.

Andrea: [laughs] Okay. What was it made out of?

Alice: Some sort of material.

Andrea: And when it was given to you do you know if it was new or if it was already second hand?

Alice: It was second hand.

Andrea: So it was even older than that.

Alice: Yes, yes.

Andrea: And you said that someone gave it to you. Can you remember who?

Alice: No

Andrea: No

Alice: It was a long time ago.

Andrea: I know. And did you play games with him?

Alice: I expect so. I’m sure I did.

Andrea: Did he have a name?

Alice: No

Andrea: Most people’s teddies didn’t I think. They were just ‘teddy’ weren’t they?

Alice: Yes, that’s right.

Andrea: And can you remember how you felt about him? You obviously still remember him. So were you fond of him, did you like him?

Alice: Oh yes, he was a nice old chap. And he sat. I had a dolly. A nice dolly. And she had a cradle and teddy sat in the cradle with her.

Andrea: So the teddy and the dolly were friends then?

Alice: Yes they were.

Andrea: And you played games with them? He didn’t just sit there on his own watching you?

Alice: [over Andrea] Oh no, we played games. Pretending games

Andrea: And I assume you don’t still have him?

Alice: No

Andrea: So what do you think your best memory of him is?

Alice: Of teddy?

Andrea: Of teddy

Alice: I don’t really know. I know he sat in the end of the cradle. Dolly was at one end. Teddy sat at the other end. He was like a brother to my dolly.

03.57 – Andrea: So tell me about your dolly then. What was she like?

Alice: She was nice. I had it for a Christmas present one year when I was quite young. The head was china. She had real hair. The head was china but the body was, in those days, it was a material body. And the one I had was black material body. But it was given to me with all the dolly clothes on.

Andrea: So again, what size was she? Was she the size of your hand, or bigger?

Alice: Quite big really. About like that [gestures]

Andrea: And you said she came with clothes. What sort of clothes did she have?

Alice: The old fashioned type of clothes.

Andrea: Mhm

Alice: My mother, she got her dressed in a white, like a baby’s christening robe that went all over. The funniest thing was, she had donkey’s ears bags. Do you know what that is?

Andrea: No, tell me.

Alice: I thought that might surprise you. It was, today we’d say knickers. But this was donkey’s ear bags. Used to tie them under the knee and a drawstring at the back. And they were generally known as donkey’s ear bags.

Andrea: I love that. I’ve never heard that term before. That’s lovely. [Laughter]. So who was she given to you by?

Alice: My mum. One Christmas

Andrea: Do you know how old you were when you got her?

Alice: I don’t know exactly, but I think I would have been about five.

Andrea: So you said she had a cradle as well?

Alice: Yes

Andrea: So she had a cradle and she had clothes. Did she have anything else?

Alice: A shawl. I wanted to take her out, I want to carry her.

Andrea: And how did you play with her?

Alice: Just pretend games. I sort of pretended she was real.

Andrea: Was she very important to you?

Alice: Yes she was when I was younger. In those days we didn’t have a lot of things. Yes, she was important.

Andrea: And again, I assume you don’t still have her?

Alice: No

Andrea: Do you know when you stopped having her? How long did you have her for?

Alice: I’m not sure of the date. I had her until I was in the forces. And my mother gave her away to a little evacuee girl. When I came home my dolly had gone. So I’d have been 24,5

Andrea: Okay. How did you feel about the doll being given away? Did you mind? Or?

Alice: I did really mind, I thought I should have been asked if she was going to be given away. But it was just done when I wasn’t there.

Andrea: Well hopefully the other little girl really liked it.

Alice: I expect she did. She hadn’t got anything. Her name – the name of the dolly was Violet

Andrea: Okay. That’s a lovely name.

Alice: My mother’s name for her.

Andrea: Did she have hair?

Alice: Yes she did.

Andrea: What was her hair like?

Alice: She had a fringe, and it came to about here [gestures] on her face.

Andrea: What colour was her hair?

Alice: Well, what we call mousy brown

Andrea: And again, what would you say is your best memory of her?

Alice: I used to take her out and play with her. I didn’t have a dolly’s pram, but I did have this cradle. I used to take her out and make it up. Take her out and sort of tidy up the bed. Things like that. Tidy up the cradle.

Andrea: And did teddy use to go with her when you took her out?

Alice: I think he must have done. I can’t actually remember, but I’m sure he must have done.

09.34 – Andrea: So, this is a bit of an odd question. Did you have any action figures? Any sort of other types of dolls, or anything that weren’t babies?

Alice: No, I don’t think I did, no.

Andrea: No, I assumed you wouldn’t. They’re a bit later I think, those. So is there anything else about your doll or your teddy that you can remember?

Alice: Not really.

10.08 – Andrea: Okay. So I’m going to ask you about construction toys. Did you have any construction toys? Things like bricks, or Meccano. Anything that you made things out of?

Alice: No, I didn’t, but the boys did. I didn’t.

Andrea: And were the boys older than you, or? Alice: One was older and one was younger Andrea: And what did they have?

Alice: Meccano. I don’t know what else. I remember Meccano.

Andrea: And did you ever play with it?

Alice: No. Weren’t allowed to. That was theirs.

Andrea: Did you want to play with it?

Alice: I wanted to be fiddling.

Andrea: You didn’t use to sneak in and play with it when they were out?

Alice: No, no.

Andrea: Do you remember how they played with it? Did they make things out of it, or?

Alice: Yes, yes. My eldest brother used to make things out of it.

Andrea: What sorts of things?

Alice: It’s a long time ago. They used to build bridges for one thing didn’t they, with Meccano?

Andrea: Did you have any bricks?

11.47 – Alice: Yes. I had something called – which I’d completely forgotten until you mentioned it – something called Wenebrix. And each piece slotted into each other. And you could make scenes with that.

Andrea: So what was that made out of?

Alice: Some sort of metal. Tin. Tin I’m sure.

Andrea: And you say you made scenes out of it. What sort of scenes?

Alice: Can’t remember, no …

Andrea: No. Maybe houses, or streets.

Alice: Houses, that’s right. Not streets I think. But I did make houses.

12.44 – Andrea: So you said you didn’t have many toys. Was there anything that you really wanted but you couldn’t have?

Alice: No, no.

Andrea: So you were quite happy just having a few toys?

Alice: Yes, yes. Nobody had lots of toys in those days. We all had a few favourite ones.

Andrea: So you had the bear, you had the doll, you had the cradle. Were there any other toys that you had that you can remember?

Alice: No, no.

13.33 – Andrea: I’ve just been passed this for you. I’ve just been passed Sunny Jim.

Alice: Oh yes, Sunny Jim, yes.

Andrea: Do you want to take him so the camera can see him?

Alice: Sunny Jim, yes. This isn’t the original one. I don’t know if you remember the cereal called Force do you? Well, when I was young we had it at home. And if you sent the packet tops and a small amount of money they sent you a Sunny Jim as featured on the box. I don’t know where that ended up. But years and years later they said people could send out and buy one. And I wanted one so badly, ‘cos I did like my Sunny Jim. So there you are. This is not the original of course.

Andrea: So did you have one as a child?

Alice: Yes. Yes I did. My mother got it for me.

Andrea: And did he come … Do you remember, did he come ready made, or did he have to be sewn together?

Alice: Oh no, he came just like that. This is an exact replica. Only this is much later in years. I couldn’t resist sending for him when they were advertising.

Andrea: Are there any other memories of dolls or bears or construction toys that you’d like to talk about? I know there’s a couple of other bears.

Alice: That’s the boys’ bears

Andrea: You can talk about the boys’ bears if you want. But any others of your own to start with?

15.30 – Alice: I did have a dolly’s cooking stove. And I was allowed to do a little bit of cooking on it. It was only a small thing. But you’d put a little bit of oil in and do half a dozen chips or something like that.

Andrea: So it did real cooking?

Alice: Yes

Andrea: And when you say it was a stove, was that putting stuff on the top of it or inside the stove?

Alice: It was both.

Andrea: Okay. And do you remember if your doll used to help you?

Alice: No

Andrea: Do you know where that came from? The stove? Do you know where it came from?

Alice: No

16.30 – Andrea: And just going back to your doll for a moment. You said your mother gave it to you.

Alice: Yes. One Christmas.

Andrea: One Christmas. So was she new, the doll?

Alice: Yes I think she was, yes.

16.46 – Andrea: Okay. I’ve been handed two bears

Alice: Is that Brunus?

Andrea: Shall I swap you? You pass me Sunny Jim, I’ll pass you this bear.

Alice: Hello Brunus

Andrea: Now you said this wasn’t your bear.

Alice: No. It was given to Brian when he was about a year old. This bear … the origin of it. They had one of these bears in London Zoo. And it was so unusual that they made these sort of things out of it. And this was given to Brian when he was about a year old.

Andrea: So what year was that?

Alice: 1949.

Andrea: He’s lovely isn’t he?

Alice: He’s gorgeous.

Andrea: So what’s he made out of?

Alice: I don’t know. He’s all soft. Stuffed with something. I don’t know what it is.

Andrea: So when Brian got him, was it furry, the bear?

Alice: Sorry?

Andrea: Was the bear furry when he was new?

Alice: Yes he was.

Andrea: So he’s been well loved.

Alice: Yes, he has.

18.23 – Andrea: I’ve also been passed this bear. I don’t know who this is. Who’s this one?

Alice: That’s Michael’s teddy. He had that one Christmas when he was about a year old. When Michael was about a year. And I can remember as if it was yesterday. He sat up in his cot. It was Christmas. And then he looked up and picked it up and said ‘Oh, a teddy’. Just like that.

Andrea: So what year was that if Michael was a year?

Alice: Um. [pause]

Brian: 1953 because Michael was born in ‘52.

Andrea: 1953 I’ve just been told. Does that sound right?

Alice: Yes. The year of the coronation.

Andrea: So where did these two bears come from?

Alice: The little teddy came from the shop at Christmas time. And this one, some cousins came to see Brian and brought him that. There was only Brian in those days.

Andrea: They’re lovely bears. Thank you for showing them to the camera. I assume the camera can see them?

Dan: Yep.

Andrea: Good

Alice: Are you taking a photo of them?

Dan: Will do

20.10 – Andrea: We will, we will. So is there anything else you want to tell us about bears and dolls, or is that everything you can remember that you want to tell us?

Alice: I think that’s about all I can remember clearly.

Andrea: In that case I’m going to say thank you very much, it’s been fascinating.

INTERVIEW ENDS 20m 27s

Alice

Alice was born in Brighton in 1918, and spent her childhood in Pyecombe. She didn’t have many toys. In the short version (10m) of her interview she discusses her teddy bear and doll, as well as Sunny Jim. In the full version (20m 31s) she also talks about Wenebrix and her sons’ teddy bears.